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Volume 59, Issue 4
July 2024
EISSN 1464-3502
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Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024

Commentary

Nicolas Garel and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae042, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae042

Review

Rachael L Murray and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae045, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae045

Articles

Miranda E Arnold and Jesse R Schank
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae031, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae031
Huanfen Li and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae033, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae033

Short Summary: The prevalence of underweight among patients with alcohol dependence reached 2.99%, much higher than that of the healthy control group. Underweight is relatively common in this population and significantly associated with smoking behavior, comorbid cerebral infarction, negative symptoms, and depressive symptoms.

Annelien Esselink and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae034, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae034

Short Summary: An online self-help guide was developed for motivated participants of a temporary abstinence challenge aimed at longer-term behavioural change. An RCT was performed, which showed that the self-help guide had no additional effect on the successful completion of the challenge, long-term self-efficacy, behavioural automaticity, craving, or alcohol consumption.

Natalie Druffner and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae035, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae035

Short Summary: We found that higher high-school IQ may predict a higher likelihood of moderate or heavy drinking, but less binge-drinking episodes, later in life. We also examine potential mediators of this relationship, household income and education, and suggest that other psychological and social factors need to be further studied.

Kazuhiro Kurihara and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae036, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae036
Morica Hutchison and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae037, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae037
Chuan-Wei Yang and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae039, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae039

Short Summary: This study examined the relationship between alcohol and MetS by using Mendelian randomization analysis. A significant linear trend was observed between MetS and the estimated probability of alcohol consumption, reflecting the likelihood of genetic predisposition to drinking based on weighted genetic risk scores. The risk of MetS increases as the likelihood of alcohol consumption increases.

Won Kim Cook and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae038, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae038

Short Summary: A coping motive, simultaneous use of cannabis, and frequent drinking at bars and parties were associated with greater odds of high-intensity drinking (HID), both for young adults ages 18–29 and adults ≥30. Sensation seeking was not significant for HID for older men.

Justyna Zaorska and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae041, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae041

Short Summary: The main finding of our study is that individuals who experienced emotional abuse in childhood experience more depressive symptoms in adulthood, have higher expectations that alcohol has an analgesic effect and that these in turn may lead to a more severe course of AUD.

Trine Finanger and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae040, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae040

Short Summary: There was a good correlation between alcohol consumption and phosphatidylethanol, which was not significantly different depending on the reporting method and not influenced by sex or body mass index. To identify persons with a daily alcohol consumption of more than two to three units, we suggest a cut-off of around 0.1 μmol/l.

Annabel Kady and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae044, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae044
Katelyn T Kirk-Provencher and others
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae043, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae043

Short Summary: We examined functional neuroimaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging) of reward, threat, and negative emotional reactivity and regulation to determine if these measures would indicate future hazardous alcohol use in 18- to 22-year-old individuals across the coming year. The amygdala response to viewing negative imagery may be explored in larger studies.

Registered Report

Mateo Leganes-Fonteneau
Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae025, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae025

Short Summary: Alcohol intoxication triggers light-headedness, stimulation, and mood changes. Our study reveals that these effects are specifically linked to alcohol’s impact on participants’ cardiac interoceptive capacity. This suggests that alcohol alters bodily sensations, shaping the drinking experience and influencing long-term expectations about its effects on the risk of hazardous alcohol use.

Correction

Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 59, Issue 4, July 2024, agae046, https://doi-org.libproxy.ucl.ac.uk/10.1093/alcalc/agae046
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